The Bugs Group, proud to add DanceBugs to their creative child development classes

The Bugs Group is the UK’s leading provider of Children’s activities offering unique programmes for children as from the moment they can walk – 12 years. Our programmes have been tailor made to enhance a child’s learning experience by using the power of stories and imagination and by building key skills such as confidence and social interaction. The BugsGroup activities encourage children to enjoy sport from a young age.

At The Bugs Group our aim is to create and develop a wide range of high quality activities and sports that places the child’s overall wellbeing at the forefront of everything we do!

Our ethos is to help every child reach their true potential in a supportive and safe environment…whilst having fun!

But did you know….

DanceBugs has recently launched in Birmingham, and is taking Solihull by a storm! Offering fun and creative dance classes for children from 3-9 years in a variety of styles from ballet and freestyle to cheerleading and tap.

All classes encourage children to express themselves positively through music and movement and they grow in confidence as they learn dance in a fun and pressure free environment.

Currently DanceBugs classes are being held at: Solihull Sixth Form College Dance Studio, Widney Manor road, Solihull, B91 3WR.

Dates with classes available:

Dainty Dancers – Ballet for children 3-5 years at 10am-10:30am

Mini Movers – Freestyle for children 3-5 years at 10:30-11am

With more classes coming SOON!

If you would like to attend a free taster at a DanceBugs class in Solihull please contact Sam on 0121 777 7792 / sam@dancebugs.com

YogaBugs has been delivering fun and educational programmes in schools for over ten years!

recommend your school

Our most popular programmes is Impact and Change, which is a results driven child development programme that helps children develop both emotionally and physically through stories, yoga inspired moves, breathing and relaxation techniques.

With YogaBugs, children learn through play, they engage in the stories which increases their concentration and listening skills, which in turn helps improve behaviour.

YogaBugs is all inclusive and non competitive, meaning children of all abilities can participate and progress at their own pace. Children feel proud of what they can achieve, which helps them grow confidence!

YogaBugs can be run as a before or after school club or within PE curriculum time, If you would like to recommend that your school starts YogaBugs from September 2015, please click here and complete the form and we will get in touch with your school when the new term starts!

For more information on the classes or birthday parties that YogaBugs has to offer in your area and to attend a FREE taster session please click here

 

A Solution To Please Ofsted & Nurseries

Ofsted want more teacher led lessons in nurseries

Ofsted’s chief inspector Sir Michael Wilshaw has claimed that too many nurseries are failing to ensure children are ready to learn when they get to primary school. There is no doubt that nurseries are feeling the pressure following comments from Children’s Minister Liz Truss who has said repeatedly that she wants to see more teacher led sessions in the nations nurseries.

Appearing on Radio 4′s Today programme Sir Michael Wilshaw said, “The corollary of not preparing children well for school is that they don’t do well in reception and, if they don’t do well in reception, they don’t get on at key stage one, they find it difficult to read at seven, they fail at the end of primary school and that failure continues into secondary school”. He went on to add that the best provision was in “school-based nurseries and school-led nurseries, because head teachers can track the progress of children in those school-based nurseries all the way into reception and beyond and make sure they do well”.

The comments and proposals by Sir Michael and Liz Truss have angered many childcare experts who already argue that early education is damaging children by pushing them too hard at a young age. Appearing on BBC Breakfast News Beatrice Merrick from the British Association Of Early Childhood Education said “We must not rush formal education too early”.

Appearing on BBC Radio 4′s Today programme in response to Sir Michael Wilshaw was National Day Nurseries Association head Purnima Tanuku. She launched a staunch defence telling Sir Michael he was ”missing the most important point here”. She also added “Your own report suggests that more than 80% of private and voluntary day nurseries are actually delivering good or outstanding quality,”

It is a fierce battle and one that is set to rage for the foreseeable future. Ground breaking children’s activity YogaBugs however may have the answer. YogaBugs is a teacher led children’s activity, that is all about children playing, using their imaginations and having fun. In a YogaBugs session children go on wild adventures, using adapted yoga poses. YogaBugs can work with children from the moment they can walk and so are ideal to provide a solution to nurseries that would please both Ofsted and the British Association Of Early Childhood Education. YogaBugs is all about learning through play.

The YogaBugs sessions are crafted by leading educational consultants alongside top yoga gurus. Working with children both emotionally and physically, YogaBugs not only provides children with fun energetic exercise, it also improves listening skills, concentration, literacy, self-esteem and social interactions. Fully compliant with Ofsted and the new Curriculum 2014, YogaBugs could be the solution for many nurseries across the UK.

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Click here to find a class or instructor near you

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Improve your childs listening skills

Improved listening skills can give children a real head start

As a parent it is very easy to get frustrated because you feel your child is not listening. Sometimes the reason for the childs none compliance is rather straightforward, they are more interested in what they are watching on television or playing on their games console. Of course other factors can also affect your childs ability to listen, such as how long they have already had to concentrate for and the environment they are in at that particular time. As a parent there are certain strategies that you can adopt to increase your childs ability to listen in all circumstances.

First of all, find your local YogaBugs class. YogaBugs sessions are especially designed to develop childrens listening skills. YogaBugs teaches children to concentrate for longer periods of time and actively encourages compliance with spoken instructions. Of course for the children they are simply having loads of fun going on a wild adventure using adapted yoga poses.

There are also lots of strategies you utilise at home to help develop your childs listening skills.

Always give lots of praise for good listening – Children love positive reinforcement. If they learn they can win your approval simply by listening then you will find them more willing to be compliant.

Make eye contact – Even though you are busy, if it is important that your child listens to you then you need to demonstrate this importance. Try and avoid talking to them across the other side of the room while you are focussed on a a different task. Stop what you are doing and ensure you have made eye contact. This will help them to engage better with what you are saying.

Be specific when giving instructions – Give your child the best possible chance of understanding by being clear with your instructions. Make clear the behaviour you want from your child and the time frame you want it in.

There is no silver bullet to developing your childs listening skills but if you take this 360 degree approach then over time you will without doubt see huge improvements.

ACROSS-THE-UK

Concentration develops over time

Inspiring children since 2006

YogaBugs develops children’s concentration

 

 

My child won’t do as they are told

 At YogaBugs we work with children aged 3-12 years old. However we not only work with the children but also the parents. Our regular contact with parents mean that our instructors often feedback and we notice some interesting trends.

One of the most common trends is that “my child struggles to concentrate.” Sometimes parents are so worried by this perceived problem that they are almost reluctant to let their child participate in a class. They are concerned their child is ‘not ready’ “Sean doesn’t always follow instructions’, or ‘Faye will often just do want she wants and that will ruin the class.’

The concern these parents have for how their child may have a negative impact on the class for others is commendable but at YogaBugs we have great news for them. All children struggle to concentrate. We are able to tell parents ‘Your concerns are totally normal and we have done the research to make sure our classes develop this part of the brain.’

Toddlers and young children’s brains work differently to those of fully grown adults. Amazingly adults can find this a very difficult concept to grasp. The truth is toddlers and young children are so interested and excited in their surroundings that their innate desire to explore the world around them means that sitting in one place for an extended period of time is of little interest to them. Young children are notoriously self-directed, quite simply they have not yet developed their brains to fully understand social norms. A young child is still developing their emotional intelligence and as such they lose the urge to stay involved once their interest has faded.

We love this about young children. At YogaBugs we work with children to help them retain this fascination with the world and we believe it is our job to be entertaining and inspire the child to engage throughout the whole session. Yes young children may struggle to sit and listen for extended periods of time, but YogaBugs engages their imagination and keeps them busy physically.

Developing the ability to concentrate

 Young children are constantly on the move and with boundless energy move quickly from one activity to the next. They have so much energy they are actually hit with an overwhelming urge to move onto something else. Again this is almost incomprehensible to adults.

As a child matures their attention span develops and matures over time.

Passive to active. – When your child was a baby they could only look at and interact with objects directly in their line of sight. As a toddler they then develop the ability to look around and choose objects. As they continue to grow they will begin to make choices. It is then up to the adult to help the child make the right decisions.

Unsystematic to systematic searching. –  A baby will just gaze at objects in a haphazard way and then put the other end in their mouth. As a baby becomes a toddler it will begin to investigate the object systematically and methodically. As they continue to grow, they will begin to make choices on what they search for, becoming more able to discern what is and what is not of interest to them.

Broad to selective. – A baby struggles with filtering out other sources of information. Toddlers however are able to concentrate more selectively. Eventually children are able to multi-task, after all even young children can play a DS and watch television at the same time.

What can parents do to help improve concentration?

 

  • Minimise distractions
  • Avoid games and television that foster short attention spans
  • Actively encourage children to look for things
  • Create a quiet area
  • Keep the house tidy
  • Develop with the child, as a child progresses so must the parent
  • Encourage use of eye contact

 

YogaBugs and Concentration

The ability to concentrate is a key life skill. It is also an important skill in becoming a good footballer. YogaBugs classes are specially designed to improve concentration for young children.

 

Ideas for encouraging kids to read

Hi folks,
Claire here I am writing the blog today, I have worked for YogaBugs for over a year now, I am a Primary School teacher with over ten years experience and I also managed a Children’s Centre. I am also more importantly a mother of two very active and energetic boys, one 6 and one 3 years old.

I wanted to write about something that as a mum and a teacher I can sometimes find frustrating. I struggle sometimes with being enthusiastic when it comes to reading the school book every night (let’s face it, they are written for learning purposes not entertainment value) or getting my boys to turn off the telly, game console etc. and come and read a book.

We are all aware of the importance of reading and how when a child does engage, it is a magical moment to see them so emerged in a story and become so excited that they can’t wait to read more (and if like my 3 year old, turns the page before you have finish), but how do we get that to happen on a regular basis and make it part of our everyday life?

I have put together some ideas and tricks for you that I have learnt over that last 12 years, when trying to convince children that reading is the best fun ever. I hope you find it interesting and more importantly useful. I would love to hear your feedback and, also as I image many of you will have your own great ideas that you have tried and tested.

Make it a Game or a Challenge; try some positive reinforcement to kick-start the reading process. Make a list of five or ten books you and your kids can read at the same time, and create a chart to keep track of how far you’re both getting. Whether it’s two pages or 200, any progress is progress worth noting. You’re a reader, too, so make time for some reading of your own! We all know how much children love to repeat the things adults say and do, and if your kids see that you’re interested in your own book, they’ll be quick to follow suit.

What Gets your Child Excited? The incentive to read is different for every child. For anyone to be motivated to do anything, they have to believe two things: (1) They have to believe they can do it, and (2) they have to want to do it. Some kids may be motivated by a sticker on the chart, while others may need the promise of a more tangible prize, like a trip to the community pool or zoo, a trip to the book store to buy a book of their choice, to catch their attention. However, Thom Barthelmess, president of the Association of Library Service to Children, cautions parents against promising TV time in exchange for reading. “Kids are smart and they’re paying attention, and the message we want to give them is that reading is its own reward. When we [offer TV as a reward for reading], we show them that reading is what you do to get something really valuable, like watch TV,” Thom says.

Dinosaur Books vs. the Remote Be sure that your kids’ books are easy to access within your home. By making kids’ books more available than the remote, you’ll encourage them to turn a page rather than turn on the TV. Do you have a box that can be left in the living room will a few selected books? Spice racks (wooden shelf types, IKEA sell them for something silly like £1.99) are great and easy to put up, fix them low so that your kids access them at any time, you’ll be amazed at how much they will use this book rack.

With emerging readers—little ones who aren’t yet reading on their own, it’s especially important to be conscious of the emphasis you place on literacy. Young children are incredibly excited to learn how to read because it moves them up that ladder to being a big kid, so use this excitement to get them looking at books and telling you the story (even if it is nothing like the story).

Reading on the road Reception teacher Nancy Singer finds that the best time to practice early reading skills is when you’re in the car. After all, she says, you’ll have a captive audience! “Parents are so busy. There just isn’t a lot of extra time anymore. But everyone’s in the car, whether it is school runs, shopping, activities etc, we all spend time with our children in the car,” Nancy says.

Look for environmental print, words you see all around you on buildings and street signs. When you drive by a restaurant or store, call out the letters. When you roll up to a stop sign, say “Stop! S-T-O-P spells stop.” “Who can spot the Tesco sign?” Nancy says efforts like this help your kids make the connection between letters, sounds and reading.

Lighten Up Help your kids realise that reading lends itself to more than just books. Encourage them to get their hands on everything they can, including comics, game directions, cereal boxes and kid-friendly websites. “Even having them go online and search for things—it’s still reading. It’s still having them comprehend and synthesize the information from what they’ve read. This also highlights to them, just how important reading is. Just as you’d curl up with your favourite magazine, there are publications geared toward kids, as well. It can sometimes be more difficult to interest boys in reading than girls. Boys, typically aren’t interested in narratives, and most of the books available for younger kids are just that. This is no excuse to let your sons off the hook. For a lot of boys, it might Sports Illustrated, there are some good magazines and comics available now, that are designed to grab boys interest, but it doesn’t matter what they read as long as they read

Reading and writing go hand in hand at the early stages of literacy. Letting little boys write about topics they’re interested it is more productive than say, asking them to journal about their favourite memory.

Time to Read Out Loud When making dinner ask your child to sit in the kitchen with you and read to you, as for most parents/carers time is something we would all like more of, ask them to help you read the recipe that you are following. I often make mistakes when I’m reading, my son loves correcting me and it also shows them that we all make mistake and reading takes practice.

The Gift That Keeps on Giving For birthdays and holidays, give your children books, just as you would a toy. Everything is more exciting dressed in wrapping paper and a bow. Thom says, from a parenting perspective, it’s as crucial to show children the importance of reading as it is to tell them. “One way to show them is by making a book into a gift, which they already know is something of great value,” he says. “We know kids having access to things to read is critically important to kids loving [reading]. Surround them.”

The more enthusiasm you show about the book, the more they’ll appreciate the gift they’ve received. Think about the stories you loved as a child. Write a personal note on the inside cover so your children understand how much this book means to you. If you cherish it, they probably will too.

And when your kids do receive a book as a gift, keep the book in a special place. Especially at a young age, kids are interested in anything—and everything—that belongs to them alone. I have a few books that I keep for special reading time together and not one that they can have all the time and handle, my little loves these and always gets excited when I ask if he would like to read one of them- (It’s the Jolly Postman at the moment).
Slow and Steady Wins the Race All children learn to read at a different pace. Instead of asking your little ones to finish a certain number of pages, look at the picture, discuss favourite parts. It doesn’t matter what page they start on it’s the reading that is important.

As a parent or anyone who is around young children, you’ve probably noticed that many love to “read” their favourite books over and over again, essentially reciting the stories from memory. (If I have to read Mr Tickle again I may go insane!)  As boring as this may be for us, this is actually an important early step in the reading process. Children learn sounds before they learn the letters that represent those sounds.

It’s counter-intuitive to us, as adults, because we associate the letter with the sound, but children learn that in the reverse order, you know for sure they’re beginning to understand and learn words when they read the same or similar words in a different context. They’re beginning to understand if they can take those skills and transfer them to a different book that they haven’t read before.”

The Monster under the Bed Leave your kids’ books next to their beds. If you encourage them to read for a few minutes each night, they’ll be polishing off books in no time. My three year who cannot read yet, insists that I leave one or two books with him, and I love to listen (outside the door) to his interpretation of the book.
Night time reading with your kids is a necessary activity (and should be an enjoyable one) this is a nice idea that can help this, create an “under the bed box.”

Take a shoe box and wrap it up with colourful paper and ribbon; make it special, and keep it in under your child’s bed. When she receives a book as a gift or brings one home from school, add it to the box and let her know she doesn’t have to share any of those specific books with her siblings or friends. At night, before your children go to sleep, go under the bed and pick out a book to read.

An Adventure of Its Own To kids of all ages, there’s nothing like a good adventure. Turn a trip to your library or local bookstore into an anticipated event, and you never know your little ones might even beat you to the car.

Help your kids sign up for a library card. Not only will they feel more grown up, but they’ll feel a sense of accomplishment and possession over their reading abilities. If, early on, you can instil in your children the value of print, they’ll carry it with them for years to come.

Choose a book for yourself while your kids make their own decision. If it is a first time visit, it make take a while, let them roam around and explore, show them where their sections are and guide their choice but ultimately give them the final choice. They may want a great big catalogue of fiction, and seemingly random books, they may just want to read about this one animal and then go back 30 pages and read about another animal, this is ok and should be encouraged.

I hope you have enjoyed this tips and that you find them useful, let’s get our children reading more.

We also have our own Pinterest page, which is full of more great ideas. Also please don’t forget to support us by liking and sharing our page on facebook/YogaBugs.

 

 

How To Support The National Literacy Trust Campaign: Give The Gift of Reading

 National Literacy Trust

The National Literacy Trust’s latest report reveals that the number of children who do not own a book is increasing. Seven years ago 1 child in 10 did not have a book of their own while today the figure stands at a startling 1 child in 3. That’s a staggering 3.8 million children! In response to the findings, the NLT has launched its Christmas Gift of Reading fundraising appeal.

The decline in children’s book ownership is of particular concern as the report shows that the number of books in the home is directly linked to children’s reading levels. Of those who have books of their own, more than half are above average readers while a third read at the expected level. The research also found that children and young people who read a book a week or more are more likely to enjoy reading and to do better at school.

In light of these findings the NLT is asking the public to give the Gift of Reading this Christmas by making a donation which could give a disadvantaged child a book of their own for the first time.You can buy the ‘gift’ for yourself or give the unique present to the booklover in your life. Those giving the Gift of Reading will be able to choose an exclusive Christmas card designed by a children’s author.

Find out more about the appeal and give the Gift of Reading.

YogaBugs Responds To Telegraph Article – Childhood Being Eroded By Modern Life

Did you see the feature in Saturday’s Telegraph reporting on a letter from a powerful lobby of more than 200 experts? In it, they warn that childhood is being eroded by a relentless diet of advertising, addictive computer games, test-driven education and poor childcare. Coinciding with the publication of a book, Too Much, Too Soon?, featuring 23 essays on early learning and the erosion of childhood, the experts urge the Government to address a culture of “too much, too soon.”

One essay by Sally Goddard Blythe, Director of the Institute for Neuro-Physiological Psychology in Chester, concluded that up to half of children were not ready for school at the age of five because of their “sedentary lifestyles”. They found it difficult to grip pencils properly, sit still, stand up straight and even catch a ball after failing to develop key physical and communication skills at a young age.

The authors of the letter, a group of academics, teachers, authors and charity leaders, argue that children’s wellbeing and mental health is being undermined by the pressures of modern life. These comments come five years after many of the same experts sent a similar letter to the Telegraph, criticising politicians and the public for failing to allow children to develop properly at a young age. This led to a debate on the state of childhood in Britain and coincided with the publication of Labour’s Children’s Plan - a policy document covering all aspects of young people’s lives.

The group is concerned that the “erosion of childhood in Britain has continued apace since 2006.” Meanwhile a UN report, published last week, accused British parents of trapping children in a cycle of “compulsive consumerism” by showering them with toys and designer labels instead of spending quality time with them. The group also criticises the education system, saying that five year-olds should be given a play-based curriculum in the first full year of school instead of formal lessons. The comments will be seen as a criticism of Coalition plans to subject all children to a reading test at the end of their first year in school.

You’ll have seen from our earlier blog posts that we have explained the critical links between the development of motor skills and hand-eye co-ordination and the development of literacy skills. In our classes at nurseries and primary schools, we see for ourselves only too clearly how the life of the modern child has become stressful, competitive and challenging. That’s why we’re absolutely committed and passionate about changing children’s lives so that they have the time to indulge in their imaginations and explore their creativity. Space to be creative is so important in this modern world where children have such little time to play. 

One of the very best things we can do for our children’s early literacy development is to simply let them play. Not only is play an important part of childhood, but we are actually helping them to build skills that are key to learning to read and write. Hand-eye coordination is a necessary skill for written language and the best way to help children develop this is to let them play with toys and activities that involve looking at, using, and discriminating a number of elements.

Furthermore in order to reach age appropriate targets in the development of left and right brain activity, children need to practice mid-line activities such as crawling, marching and balancing. For some children, developing these skills is particularly challenging so making this fun is key. Activities that combine story-telling and magical adventures with physical activities such as yoga are a great way of developing imaginations whilst practising essential developmental motor skills.

We’ve written to The Telegraph adding our support to this letter. Meanwhile thank you to this group of experts for highlighting these issues so powerfully.

Yoga Books and Activities For The End Of A School Day

The hurly burley surrounding the start of the new school year can leave parents and kids feeling stressed and over-whelmed. As well as improving flexibility, strength, and body awareness, yoga can help to calm kids down. In addition to our own YogaBugs DVD and book, there are a number of others that you can use at home with your kids. Here are just a handful of our favorites.

For toddlers, try out the Little Yoga series by Rebecca Whitford and Martina Selway. Little Yoga: A Toddler’s First Book of Yoga and Sleepy Little Yoga: A Toddler’s Sleepy Book of Yogaboth contain fun, colourful pictures which encourage kids to make simple yoga shapes with their bodies.  Sleepy Little Yoga makes a great bedtime book. At the back of the book, you’ll find a note for supervising adults as well as an explanation about how to get into the postures.

We’re particularly fond of Babar’s Yoga For Elephants. Written by Babar, the book explains how  he and Celeste keep fit doing yoga on their many travels. Through simple instructions and step-by-step illustrations, Babar’s Yoga For Elephants presents 15 postures and stretches as well as helpful breathing exercises. The book also provides particularly useful advice on what you should do with your trunk while in poses, a problem never addressed in yoga books for humans.

Buddha at Bedtime: Tales of Love and Wisdom for You to Read with Your Child to Enchant, Enlighten and Inspire is a great book offering a summary of Buddhism and child friendly meditation techniques. The stories are fables with a moral at the end, which although Buddist in origin, would be appeal to most beliefs. The author, Dharmachari Nagaraja, regularly presented BBC Radio 2′s Pause for Thought with Terry Wogan.  He is currently involved with the Glasgow Buddhist Centre where he works as a psychotherapist, having run the Covent Garden Meditation Centre in London..

For bigger kids, Bear Cub Books has a collection of titles about Hindu folklore which  include How Ganesh Got His Elephant Head, Hanuman’s Journey to the Medicine Mountain, and  How Pavarti Won The Heart of Shiva. The author, Vatsala Sperling, draws on stories told to her by her mother when she was a young girl in India, bringing the myths of Parvati and Shiva, Ganesh and Hanuman to life. The illustrations are beautiful.

Yoga Pretzels is a  great way for parents and kids to have fun together. Each card is colour coded to indicate the type of activity – breathing, meditating, stretching, partner positions etc. One side of the card gives a colourful illustration of the pose/ activity, whilst the other side offers step by step instructions. Teachers and parents who have seen me using them have frequently asked where they can buy them. Kids can choose the cards themselves and create their own sessions.

We’d love to hear about your favourite yoga books and activities for children! Post your comments here – or on our Facebook page.

Hand-Eye Co-ordination and Visual Discrimination Key to Literacy

As it’s World Literacy Day tomorrow, we wanted to focus on ways in which children can develop their reading skills. One of the very best things you can do for your child’s early literacy development is to simply let them play. Not only is play an important part of childhood, but you are actually helping them to build skills that are key to learning to read and write.Hand-eye coordination is a necessary skill for written language and the best way to help your child develop this is to let them play with toys and activities that involve looking at, using, and discriminating a number of elements. Puzzles are a great activity for this as are building blocks, Lego and construction toys.

Studies have shown that spending time on hand-eye co-ordination improves children’s ability to learn to read and reduces the likelihood of reading difficulties. In fact engaging in a variety of craft activities, which most kids love, is very beneficial so add play-dough, stickers and glue sticks to your list of educational supplies.

   

Puzzles help to develop hand-eye coordination because learning to control our hands and fingers – according to information received from sight – is a co-ordination skill that helps children in early attempts at reading and writing. Working out which piece goes where, figuring out how to fit pieces into place by making adjustments and seeing a sequence develop in an organized pattern is a valuable learning experience as well as fun for children.

Puzzles, matching games, and the like help children to learn visual discrimination. Visual discrimination is the ability of the brain to quickly tell the difference among visually similar letters, like “p,” “b,” and “q” or between words such as “was” and “saw.” Students with difficulty making these distinctions often struggle with learning to read, write, and spell. Playing games, engaging in activities or with toys that help children discriminate among similar objects can be fun for the child and help them master an important pre-literacy skill. Getting your child to help you sort out loose change in their piggy bank is a great way of encouraging visual discrimination.

Encourage your child to work their wrist and finger muscles as well as work on their co-ordination and fine motor skills to help prepare them for handwriting practice in their future. Activities that help include Lego and other building sets, play-dough, puzzles, pegboards and beads.

To celebrate National Literacy Day, the Duchess of Cornwall, Patron of the National Literacy Trust, will join the Poet Laureate, Carol Ann Duffy, to raise the profile of poetry in schools. Camilla is expected to read one of her favourite verses as she launches the Anthologise project – a competition in which groups of pupils will compile their own collections. Anthologise has been devised by the Poet Laureate to encourage wider reading, appreciation and enjoyment of poetry among school children. The competition is aimed at groups of any size from British secondary schools.