Well done to YogaBugs Franchisee Karen Williams celebrating her 1st Year with YogaBugs!

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We would like to say a BIG congratulation to Karen Williams our YogaBugs Teesside Regional Manager, who is celebrating her first year With YogaBugs in style by securing 45 hours per week in schools and nurseries in the Teesside area for the new school term in September.

Since Karen joined YogaBugs in August 2014, she has been off to a flying start with so many Head Teachers and PE Co-Ordinators loving the YogaBugs’ ethos and recommending her to others in the area – she is proud to be stretching the imagination of so many children in schools and nurseries in her territory.

Please see below a fantastic testimonial from one of the schools Karen is currently working in….

“The days Karen comes in to work with our nursery children are always so exciting for us all – children and staff love her!  She has a really good manner with the children and always tries to link with our curriculum which has been lovely to see.  As this year is progressing we can see how well the children are responding to the exercises she does with them, now she can say the name of one of the familiar postures and the children respond by getting themselves into the correct position.  We are all big advocators of YogaBugs in Nursery and Karen is doing a marvellous job with the children”.

Kate JukesNursery Teacher at Green Lane Primary Academy, Acklam. 

When we caught up with Karen and asked her what made her choose YogaBugs this time last year this is what she said…

“Following eleven years as a primary school teacher and after having my two children, I began looking for a better work/life balance that would allow me to combine my love of working with children and my desire to run my own business. When I came across YogaBugs I knew it was the right thing for me! Children can be introduced to the benefits of yoga whilst most importantly using their imagination and having fun I love seeing the impact that YogaBugs can have on children who take part in our classes”.

Karen has truly taken her first year with YogaBugs by storm, and we cannot wait to see the growing impact that she will have on schools and nurseries in her area in the 2015/16 new school term!

Well Done Karen,

Keep up the great work!

If you would like to find out if your area is available and how to become a successful YogaBugs’ franchisee like Karen, Please contact Lisa Applebee-O’Connor on 0121 777 7792 / franchise@yogabugs.com.

When was the last time you went to work and laughed all day?

For franchisers in the child based sector all over the UK a day at work is never a dull day!

There are more than 13 million children living in the UK alone, so is no surprise that child-based franchises have become the most popular franchise opportunity for people to invest in. Franchisor Mark Goode believes that the child-based sector offers huge opportunities, as parents are always willing to invest in their child’s education and health. Having a franchise in the child base sector goes above and beyond the financial rewards as your business will help children to learn, grow and develop and to also help tackle child obesity in the UK.

You may think that you need to know everything about Yoga in order to become a YogaBugs franchise but this is not the case as you do not need a yoga background to become a YogaBugs franchisee. In fact, when Mark Goode started out as a franchisee he didn’t fully understand what yoga was, if you’d said to me three years ago that Id be involved in child yoga I would have looked at you very strangely, he now jokes. Now CEO, the business model Mark developed in his own franchise was so successful that the entire network adopted his approach. He says: I loved the company so much I bought it myself! Mark then went onto develop the Bugs Group and introduced FootieBugs, which teaches football skills in a fun an innovative way.

These children’s franchises are a perfect fit for people who are commercially minded and want to develop a thriving business. Mark explains that a franchise for any one of these companies will suit entrepreneurial, business-minded people who want to follow a proven successful method. Prospective franchisees should be business minded first, and then the passion for the product comes alongside it with anyone of our franchisees, says Mark.

Child-based franchises such as YogaBugs are seen as mainly a female-dominated industry but are increasingly attracting men. Fenella Lindsell founder of YogaBugs explains YogaBugs used to be seen as a mainly female dominated industry but we are getting more men coming through. Especially the younger ones that have been working in the Yoga industry and are looking for other opportunities.

Mark Goode adds were also getting husband-and-wife teams that are very much interested in investing money into a child-based franchise as they want to be able to pick their own destiny rather than just solely relying on jobs that may not be secure in as little as 5-years time.

YogaBugs and FootieBugs offers classes from an average of just £5-6 a class. This makes it affordable for parents who do not want to compromise their children’s physical activities. Mark adds “We’ve actually seen an increase in the YogaBugs and FootieBugs classes. Parents are no longer going on big holidays, due to this they are looking at smaller opportunities available for their children during term-time and after school”

As a franchisee of a child-based business you will undoubtedly see children progress, develop, learn and stay fit and healthy. Mark continues by saying “You are working with children who may not have a healthy lifestyle at home – you may only have them for an hour a week, but it is that hour that can make all the difference. In that hour you can give something positive back to that child and seeing the benefit from it, is incredibly rewarding as you are helping to make a difference by tackling childhood obesity.”

This sense of reward and achievement is often the very core of why people want to get involved with working with children. For Mark Goode, YogaBugs transformed his outlook on life: It actually changed some of the relationships I had with friends and family  you start to appreciate things more because you see that you are in a world where not everybody has what you have. It grounds you.

A business franchise that helps child development, education, social skills, and helps to keep a child fit, active and healthy often attracts interest and support from the Government, which can help massively to increase interest and demand for a business such as YogaBugs and FootieBugs. Mark explains, “The Government announced new funding for schools with sport and PE premium, for the next academic year. The money will be given directly to primary schools in England, and this can be used in order to pay for extra coaching sessions to improve the quality of sports and PE provision in schools across the UK.” This is great news for YogaBugs and FootieBugs. A position of such high priority on the Governments agenda can only be beneficial for a franchise such as YogaBugs and FootieBugs.

It would be impossible not to feel inspired by child-based franchises, which can provide education, fitness and emotional development for children. So why not listen to your inner-child and return to a child-like happiness by working with children today! Franchise opportunities are available today…why not take the next step?

YogaBugs: www.yogafranchises.co.uk

A Solution To Please Ofsted & Nurseries

Ofsted want more teacher led lessons in nurseries

Ofsted’s chief inspector Sir Michael Wilshaw has claimed that too many nurseries are failing to ensure children are ready to learn when they get to primary school. There is no doubt that nurseries are feeling the pressure following comments from Children’s Minister Liz Truss who has said repeatedly that she wants to see more teacher led sessions in the nations nurseries.

Appearing on Radio 4′s Today programme Sir Michael Wilshaw said, “The corollary of not preparing children well for school is that they don’t do well in reception and, if they don’t do well in reception, they don’t get on at key stage one, they find it difficult to read at seven, they fail at the end of primary school and that failure continues into secondary school”. He went on to add that the best provision was in “school-based nurseries and school-led nurseries, because head teachers can track the progress of children in those school-based nurseries all the way into reception and beyond and make sure they do well”.

The comments and proposals by Sir Michael and Liz Truss have angered many childcare experts who already argue that early education is damaging children by pushing them too hard at a young age. Appearing on BBC Breakfast News Beatrice Merrick from the British Association Of Early Childhood Education said “We must not rush formal education too early”.

Appearing on BBC Radio 4′s Today programme in response to Sir Michael Wilshaw was National Day Nurseries Association head Purnima Tanuku. She launched a staunch defence telling Sir Michael he was ”missing the most important point here”. She also added “Your own report suggests that more than 80% of private and voluntary day nurseries are actually delivering good or outstanding quality,”

It is a fierce battle and one that is set to rage for the foreseeable future. Ground breaking children’s activity YogaBugs however may have the answer. YogaBugs is a teacher led children’s activity, that is all about children playing, using their imaginations and having fun. In a YogaBugs session children go on wild adventures, using adapted yoga poses. YogaBugs can work with children from the moment they can walk and so are ideal to provide a solution to nurseries that would please both Ofsted and the British Association Of Early Childhood Education. YogaBugs is all about learning through play.

The YogaBugs sessions are crafted by leading educational consultants alongside top yoga gurus. Working with children both emotionally and physically, YogaBugs not only provides children with fun energetic exercise, it also improves listening skills, concentration, literacy, self-esteem and social interactions. Fully compliant with Ofsted and the new Curriculum 2014, YogaBugs could be the solution for many nurseries across the UK.

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Improve your childs listening skills

Improved listening skills can give children a real head start

As a parent it is very easy to get frustrated because you feel your child is not listening. Sometimes the reason for the childs none compliance is rather straightforward, they are more interested in what they are watching on television or playing on their games console. Of course other factors can also affect your childs ability to listen, such as how long they have already had to concentrate for and the environment they are in at that particular time. As a parent there are certain strategies that you can adopt to increase your childs ability to listen in all circumstances.

First of all, find your local YogaBugs class. YogaBugs sessions are especially designed to develop childrens listening skills. YogaBugs teaches children to concentrate for longer periods of time and actively encourages compliance with spoken instructions. Of course for the children they are simply having loads of fun going on a wild adventure using adapted yoga poses.

There are also lots of strategies you utilise at home to help develop your childs listening skills.

Always give lots of praise for good listening – Children love positive reinforcement. If they learn they can win your approval simply by listening then you will find them more willing to be compliant.

Make eye contact – Even though you are busy, if it is important that your child listens to you then you need to demonstrate this importance. Try and avoid talking to them across the other side of the room while you are focussed on a a different task. Stop what you are doing and ensure you have made eye contact. This will help them to engage better with what you are saying.

Be specific when giving instructions – Give your child the best possible chance of understanding by being clear with your instructions. Make clear the behaviour you want from your child and the time frame you want it in.

There is no silver bullet to developing your childs listening skills but if you take this 360 degree approach then over time you will without doubt see huge improvements.

ACROSS-THE-UK

Children learn through play

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As a parent it is not always easy to engage your children with something that is educational. They can get distracted, bored or simply become unreceptive. When a child no longer wishes to learn, they will however be willing to play. The shrewd approach here is to make sure they are learning by stealth.

First of all when children play they are learning to solve problems. how to interact with others and how to develop the fine and gross motor skills needed to grow and learn. Playing can help children do the following:

  • Develop physical skills. Gross motor skills are developed as a child learns to reach, grasp, crawl, climb and balance. Fine motor skills develop slightly later as children learn to handle small toys.
  • Develop cognitive concepts. Children learn to solve problems (What does this do? Does this puzzle piece fit here?) through play. Children also learn colors, numbers, size and shapes. They have the ability to enhance their memory skills as well as their attention span. Children move on to higher levels of thought as they play in a more stimulating environment.
  • Develop language skills. Language develops as a child plays and interacts with others. This begins with parents playing cooing games with their children and advances to practical levels such as telling make-believe stories and jokes.
  • Develop social skills. Learning to cooperate, negotiate, take turns and play by the rules are all important skills learned in early games. These skills grow as the child plays. As a result, children learn the roles and rules of society.

So what can you do as a parent to encourage learning through play. You are child’s first playmate and you have an important role to play. Interestingly children tend to be more creative when their parent is involved in play. To bring out this creativity simply observe, follow and be creative.

Group environments are really great to help children develop and learn through play. Naturally, structured play will have more benefits than free play. The right after school club or Saturday morning activity will provide this environment for structured play.

YogaBugs does this fantastically. Children are able to imagine themselves as lions or pirates, whilst enjoying physical exercise, developing self-esteem, social interaction and numeracy and literacy skills. This is real learning by stealth.

ACROSS-THE-UK

 

A great idea for an original Christmas present

Happy Christmas From The YogaBugs Team

Happy Christmas From The YogaBugs Team

What do you buy the child that has everything? Finding the right gift at Christmas can be difficult, finding an original gift even more so. Yet creative parents across the UK seem to have found the perfect solution. YogaBugs.

“It has been quite surprising. We have had a nice upturn in visits to the website and bookings for the New Year, with parents or close family booking children into classes as Christmas presents. They are looking for something that lasts way beyond Christmas, something more than just a toy.” said a spokesperson from Bugs HQ.

YogaBugs is a unique children’s activity devised by the consultant to hit CBeebies show Waybaloo, Fenella Lindsell. The sessions take children on wild adventures where they can be lions, jungle explorers or pirates. This is all done through yoga postures giving the children a physical workout by stealth. The sessions also have hidden benefits as the classes have been devised to also improve literacy, numeracy and self-esteem. The sessions are really inclusive and accessible to all.

Linda a mum of a YogaBugs child, reckons YogaBugs is the ideal Christmas gift. “I love the way in which Yogabugs has enabled Annabel to explore worlds and visit places in her imagination; it is the perfect antidote to a busy school day.”

All YogaBugs instructors are qualified, highly trained, well motivated and CRB checked. This is why parents across the UK see YogaBugs as the perfect antidote to games consoles, tablets and DVDs. 

 

Yoga is now a secular practice

YUP - Down DogVarious traditions of yoga are found in Hinduism, Buddhism and Jainism and it is practised as a spiritual and ascetic discipline. It is of course for many still an integral part of their religion. Yet, yoga has been embraced across the Western world and by people of all races, cultures and most religions. Across the West, yoga with its breath control, simple meditation, and the adoption of specific bodily postures, is widely practised for health and relaxation.

There are many hidden benefits with yoga such as improved concentration, posture and improved strength and flexibility. With YogaBugs unique use of storytelling and adventures told through the medium of yoga there are other benefits to children from when they can walk until the age of 12. These include concentration, core skill development and improved social development.

In the West for the vast majority yoga is totally secular. It is not a medium for teaching religious beliefs. But across the globe yoga instructors have come up against vocal and determined opposition. This was recently highlighted in the United States. The issue of yoga in schools reached a boiling point in California this summer when a family filed a suit against the Encinitas Unified School District after the start of a pilot yoga program in an elementary school. As Reuters notes, a judge refused to block the teaching in July, ruling that ‘yoga at it’s roots is religious.’ but its modern practice is secular and “a distinctly American cultural phenomenon.”

In the USA yoga practitioners simply dismiss such criticisms as a  ’concern of the far right’.  In the UK whilst yoga rarely has to fight such prejudice on religious grounds it is still viewed by some with scepticism. This is despite recommendations from many health organisations including the NHS.

YogaBugs has a crucial role to play going forward. Whilst it uses traditional yoga  postures it inspires children to be physically active and use their imagination. Yoga has simply become a medium of play with many benefits, hidden from the children because they are having great fun. It is learning by stealth. Anyone who ever watches or participates in a YogaBugs class instantly changes their preconceptions and marvels at how the classes work. The children really enjoy them and over time when they attend regularly parents see measurable benefits to their children’s life skills.

The only way for yoga to overcome the negative preconceptions is for companies like YogaBugs to drive the message forward. As a business opportunity YogaBugs has everything you could need to be a success. With 10 years franchising experience YogaBugs are the leading children’s activity franchisor. Whilst YogaBugs have franchisees making a difference across the country we are always looking for the right people to spread the message. If you would like to find out more about the YogaBugs franchise opportunity click here www.yogafranchises.co.uk

Many of our franchise owners are not yoga teachers themselves but were attracted by the nature of the business. YogaBugs has such a distinct offering that there is nothing else quite like it. It inspires children to be both physically and emotionally active. It ticks all the boxes and encourages children to think for themselves, which means ultimately they will one day be able to form their own beliefs. This can only be a good thing.

 

Ideas for encouraging kids to read

Hi folks,
Claire here I am writing the blog today, I have worked for YogaBugs for over a year now, I am a Primary School teacher with over ten years experience and I also managed a Children’s Centre. I am also more importantly a mother of two very active and energetic boys, one 6 and one 3 years old.

I wanted to write about something that as a mum and a teacher I can sometimes find frustrating. I struggle sometimes with being enthusiastic when it comes to reading the school book every night (let’s face it, they are written for learning purposes not entertainment value) or getting my boys to turn off the telly, game console etc. and come and read a book.

We are all aware of the importance of reading and how when a child does engage, it is a magical moment to see them so emerged in a story and become so excited that they can’t wait to read more (and if like my 3 year old, turns the page before you have finish), but how do we get that to happen on a regular basis and make it part of our everyday life?

I have put together some ideas and tricks for you that I have learnt over that last 12 years, when trying to convince children that reading is the best fun ever. I hope you find it interesting and more importantly useful. I would love to hear your feedback and, also as I image many of you will have your own great ideas that you have tried and tested.

Make it a Game or a Challenge; try some positive reinforcement to kick-start the reading process. Make a list of five or ten books you and your kids can read at the same time, and create a chart to keep track of how far you’re both getting. Whether it’s two pages or 200, any progress is progress worth noting. You’re a reader, too, so make time for some reading of your own! We all know how much children love to repeat the things adults say and do, and if your kids see that you’re interested in your own book, they’ll be quick to follow suit.

What Gets your Child Excited? The incentive to read is different for every child. For anyone to be motivated to do anything, they have to believe two things: (1) They have to believe they can do it, and (2) they have to want to do it. Some kids may be motivated by a sticker on the chart, while others may need the promise of a more tangible prize, like a trip to the community pool or zoo, a trip to the book store to buy a book of their choice, to catch their attention. However, Thom Barthelmess, president of the Association of Library Service to Children, cautions parents against promising TV time in exchange for reading. “Kids are smart and they’re paying attention, and the message we want to give them is that reading is its own reward. When we [offer TV as a reward for reading], we show them that reading is what you do to get something really valuable, like watch TV,” Thom says.

Dinosaur Books vs. the Remote Be sure that your kids’ books are easy to access within your home. By making kids’ books more available than the remote, you’ll encourage them to turn a page rather than turn on the TV. Do you have a box that can be left in the living room will a few selected books? Spice racks (wooden shelf types, IKEA sell them for something silly like £1.99) are great and easy to put up, fix them low so that your kids access them at any time, you’ll be amazed at how much they will use this book rack.

With emerging readers—little ones who aren’t yet reading on their own, it’s especially important to be conscious of the emphasis you place on literacy. Young children are incredibly excited to learn how to read because it moves them up that ladder to being a big kid, so use this excitement to get them looking at books and telling you the story (even if it is nothing like the story).

Reading on the road Reception teacher Nancy Singer finds that the best time to practice early reading skills is when you’re in the car. After all, she says, you’ll have a captive audience! “Parents are so busy. There just isn’t a lot of extra time anymore. But everyone’s in the car, whether it is school runs, shopping, activities etc, we all spend time with our children in the car,” Nancy says.

Look for environmental print, words you see all around you on buildings and street signs. When you drive by a restaurant or store, call out the letters. When you roll up to a stop sign, say “Stop! S-T-O-P spells stop.” “Who can spot the Tesco sign?” Nancy says efforts like this help your kids make the connection between letters, sounds and reading.

Lighten Up Help your kids realise that reading lends itself to more than just books. Encourage them to get their hands on everything they can, including comics, game directions, cereal boxes and kid-friendly websites. “Even having them go online and search for things—it’s still reading. It’s still having them comprehend and synthesize the information from what they’ve read. This also highlights to them, just how important reading is. Just as you’d curl up with your favourite magazine, there are publications geared toward kids, as well. It can sometimes be more difficult to interest boys in reading than girls. Boys, typically aren’t interested in narratives, and most of the books available for younger kids are just that. This is no excuse to let your sons off the hook. For a lot of boys, it might Sports Illustrated, there are some good magazines and comics available now, that are designed to grab boys interest, but it doesn’t matter what they read as long as they read

Reading and writing go hand in hand at the early stages of literacy. Letting little boys write about topics they’re interested it is more productive than say, asking them to journal about their favourite memory.

Time to Read Out Loud When making dinner ask your child to sit in the kitchen with you and read to you, as for most parents/carers time is something we would all like more of, ask them to help you read the recipe that you are following. I often make mistakes when I’m reading, my son loves correcting me and it also shows them that we all make mistake and reading takes practice.

The Gift That Keeps on Giving For birthdays and holidays, give your children books, just as you would a toy. Everything is more exciting dressed in wrapping paper and a bow. Thom says, from a parenting perspective, it’s as crucial to show children the importance of reading as it is to tell them. “One way to show them is by making a book into a gift, which they already know is something of great value,” he says. “We know kids having access to things to read is critically important to kids loving [reading]. Surround them.”

The more enthusiasm you show about the book, the more they’ll appreciate the gift they’ve received. Think about the stories you loved as a child. Write a personal note on the inside cover so your children understand how much this book means to you. If you cherish it, they probably will too.

And when your kids do receive a book as a gift, keep the book in a special place. Especially at a young age, kids are interested in anything—and everything—that belongs to them alone. I have a few books that I keep for special reading time together and not one that they can have all the time and handle, my little loves these and always gets excited when I ask if he would like to read one of them- (It’s the Jolly Postman at the moment).
Slow and Steady Wins the Race All children learn to read at a different pace. Instead of asking your little ones to finish a certain number of pages, look at the picture, discuss favourite parts. It doesn’t matter what page they start on it’s the reading that is important.

As a parent or anyone who is around young children, you’ve probably noticed that many love to “read” their favourite books over and over again, essentially reciting the stories from memory. (If I have to read Mr Tickle again I may go insane!)  As boring as this may be for us, this is actually an important early step in the reading process. Children learn sounds before they learn the letters that represent those sounds.

It’s counter-intuitive to us, as adults, because we associate the letter with the sound, but children learn that in the reverse order, you know for sure they’re beginning to understand and learn words when they read the same or similar words in a different context. They’re beginning to understand if they can take those skills and transfer them to a different book that they haven’t read before.”

The Monster under the Bed Leave your kids’ books next to their beds. If you encourage them to read for a few minutes each night, they’ll be polishing off books in no time. My three year who cannot read yet, insists that I leave one or two books with him, and I love to listen (outside the door) to his interpretation of the book.
Night time reading with your kids is a necessary activity (and should be an enjoyable one) this is a nice idea that can help this, create an “under the bed box.”

Take a shoe box and wrap it up with colourful paper and ribbon; make it special, and keep it in under your child’s bed. When she receives a book as a gift or brings one home from school, add it to the box and let her know she doesn’t have to share any of those specific books with her siblings or friends. At night, before your children go to sleep, go under the bed and pick out a book to read.

An Adventure of Its Own To kids of all ages, there’s nothing like a good adventure. Turn a trip to your library or local bookstore into an anticipated event, and you never know your little ones might even beat you to the car.

Help your kids sign up for a library card. Not only will they feel more grown up, but they’ll feel a sense of accomplishment and possession over their reading abilities. If, early on, you can instil in your children the value of print, they’ll carry it with them for years to come.

Choose a book for yourself while your kids make their own decision. If it is a first time visit, it make take a while, let them roam around and explore, show them where their sections are and guide their choice but ultimately give them the final choice. They may want a great big catalogue of fiction, and seemingly random books, they may just want to read about this one animal and then go back 30 pages and read about another animal, this is ok and should be encouraged.

I hope you have enjoyed this tips and that you find them useful, let’s get our children reading more.

We also have our own Pinterest page, which is full of more great ideas. Also please don’t forget to support us by liking and sharing our page on facebook/YogaBugs.

 

 

Commission on Boy’s Reading

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When researching the schools we’re working with, our Area Directors will read the Ofsted report as these give a useful overview of the specific challenges each school is working towards addressing.Time and again these reports comment that boys are attaining lower levels in reading and writing. We were delighted to learn that one of our favourite charities, the National Literacy Trust, has been working with the House of Commons’ All-Party Parliamentary Literacy Group to set up a Commission on boys’ reading.

The commission is evaluating a wealth of research showing that more boys struggle with reading than girls, and that boys have poorer attitudes towards reading and spend less time reading outside of school. As a result, boys with poor reading skills will struggle to succeed at school and this will impact on their life chances. The aim of the Commission is to make realistic recommendations that will to help improve boys’ reading in the UK.

Expert witnesses taking part in the evidence session included former Children’s Laureate Michael Rosen, children’s author and screenwriter Anthony Horowitz, as well as teachers, academics, family charities and Ofsted. The final report of the commission will recommend key policies for schools, libraries and local areas and suggest approaches that should be supported and expanded across the country.

 

New Study of YogaBugs School’s Programme Shows Remarkable Results

Today YogaBugs, the UK’s leading provider of children’s yoga, published the first evaluation of its Impact & Change programme for schools. The study evaluated results from 1,122 children who participated in its Impact & Change programme from across 50 different schools. Nine areas related to emotional and physical aspects of learning were analysed. Remarkably the results from children at Key Stage 1 showed an overall improvement of 39% across the nine areas evaluated, whilst children at Key Stage 2 showed an overall improvement of 38%.

In addition the study found:

  • The overall improvement made by boys was 39% by whilst the overall improvement made by girls was 38%;
  • Before the programme, children at Key Stage 1 scored an average of 5.7 out of 10 for confidence, with this rising to 8.1 when the programme ended;
  • There was an overall increase of 37% in the ability of children at Key Stage 1 to concentrate and listen, rising to 41% at Key Stage 2;
  • There was an overall increase of 39% in the ability of children at Key Stage 1 to work co-operatively, respect and relate well to others whilst the overall improvement made at Key Stage 2 was 36%;
  • There was an overall increase of 41% in the fitness of children at Key Stage 1 whilst the overall improvement made at Key Stage 2 was 34%.

To ensure a full cross section of children were included in the study, the results from a total of 1,122 children were analysed. 591 boys and 531 girls took part. 651 were from the Key Stage 1 age group and 471 were from the Key Stage 2 age group. To measure whether financial background made a difference to skill levels, a cross-section of schools from low-income areas (£10,000 or less), mid-income areas (£25,000 – £35,000) and high-income areas (£50,000 plus) were selected. The results were consistent across the three income groups.

The purpose of the Impact & Change programme is to increase children’s emotional, physical and social development whilst also providing schools with tangible evidence of its results and benefits. At the start of the 10 week programme, the YogaBugs teacher delivers a short programme to the class teacher, giving them the skills to use breathing and relaxation techniques with children on a daily basis. This helps to reinforce the weekly programme of YogaBugs classes which are based on key texts such as “Giraffes Can’t Dance” and “We’re Going On A Bear Hunt” to take children on a magical adventure. These stories provide stimulus for the imagination and are central to the YogaBugs vision.

Classes follow a clear structure with exercises to warm up at the beginning, followed by an adventure into which yoga postures are weaved and a period of relaxation at the end. The class teacher assesses the children’s social, physical and behaviour skills before and after the course. At the end of the programme, the school receives a full report highlighting the changes that have resulted in each of the nine areas assessed.

Fenella Lindsell, founder of YogaBugs explains why the Impact & Change programme has been so effective:

“Many of us practice yoga for the physical benefits we gain in terms of improved mobility, flexibility, strength and stamina but we may not have realized quite how much yoga helps us mentally and emotionally.  We’re really excited by the results that have been gathered from our Impact and Change Programme and feel it is an ideal time to highlight them to more schools nationwide.  The Healthy Schools Programme underlines the importance of emotional well-being.  A child who is confident and happy will be an easier and more responsive child to teach and the child will enjoy learning more as a result.”

Commenting on the success of the programmes, Mark Goode, YogaBugs CEO said:

“YogaBugs programmes have been carefully and specifically designed with the purpose of improving children’s emotional and physical literacy. They target nine main areas based on developing social, emotional, physical and behavioural skills. Our goal is to improve the overall well-being of every child. What is remarkable is that regardless of a child’s background or gender, the YogaBugs programme achieved major improvements across all the nine targeted areas.”