Top Five Tips To Improve Your Child’s Concentration

  1. Get your child to YogaBugs. Unlike any other children’s activities YogaBugs is specially designed to not only give your child an enjoyable physical work out but also to improve their concentration. They will learn loads, have fun and develop their concentration skills. By using the yoga postures to tell stories, YogaBugs are able to engage children on a variety of levels and develop many skills.
  2. Play ‘Beat The Clock’. Deadlines get things done. If a task has to be completed in a set time this will help your child focus. They way to make it fun is to turn into a game. As a general rule assume your child can concentrate without a break for one minute per year of age. So if your child is 5, set the clock to 5 minutes and ask them to complete the task before the alarm rings.
  3. Avoid overwhelming your child. If your child is whisked from activity to activity they will never settle. Choose a couple of activities and allow for downtime in between. This will help them focus and will produce better results. Remember quality over quantity.
  4. Eat the right foods. Eating healthy food will give your child the energy they need to focus for longer. Avoid foods that are high in sugar as these will lead your child to crash.
  5. Remove all distractions. If you want your child to focus make sure all diversions are out of the way. If the television is off it ceases to become an option. There is no such thing as multi-tasking only multi-failing.

To find your local YogaBugs class or to attend a free taster session please visit: www.yogabugs.com.

We are actively seeking business minded individuals to join our team of talented franchisees who bring the joy of YogaBugs to children in their area. Please visitwww.yogafranchises.co.uk for more info or call Lisa on 0121 77 77792

5 Ways To Make Healthy Eating Fun

What are meal times like in your house? Are they fun, calm happy times or can they be stressful? How healthy are they? Are meal times happier, calmer and more fun the more unhealthy the meal? Typical!

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We all know that we should eat healthy but the reality can be a little bit more difficult. How often do you cook three different meals at the same time for your family? At YogaBugs we know that you and your family need the right fuel to have the energy to have fun. That’s why we are giving you our five top tips to make healthy eating fun.

  1. Dip it – Most kids don’t like eating vegetables and this can cause a lot of tension at meal times. You know they need vegetables so why not see what you can do to disguise them and improve the flavour. We suggest a mild salsa or yoghurt-based dressing.
  2. You are not a cafe – As the parent you are in charge of the evening meal, if you allow yourself to be treated like a restaurant don’t be surprised when your child places an order that is different to what you were intending to cook. Children will mimic adult behaviour. Get into the habit of cooking just the one meal. Take back control of the kitchen.
  3. Carefully introduce new foods – Allow your children to get used to new flavours. Don’t overload their plate, explain that their taste buds will need time to adapt. Also consider who their heroes are. Does their hero eat broccoli? We shall let you decide.
  4. Breakfast is the most important meal of the day – Mornings might be chaotic but you need to make the most of them. Find a cereal that the kids want but that you agree with. Try and avoid chocolate but accept that there might be some sugar. A proper breakfast will decrease your child’s desire to snack. Get them into the habit from an early age. It will really make a big difference to their entire life.
  5. Get them involved – We all feel better when we have ownership of a situation. Take your children shopping with you. It can be a great place to have conversations about healthy eating and educate them to the right ways of eating. Then get them to help with the cooking. You will find their appetite grow for even the most mundane meal if they have been involved in it’s creation.

Happy Healthy Eating

ACROSS-THE-UK

What will it take for people to get the message?

Healthy diet and exercise is the only way forward

Healthy diet and exercise is the only way forward

This week The Sunday Times obtained some seriously scary information in a Freedom of Information Request from Newport Council. In August 2012 a five year old girl was taken into care because she weighed more than three times the weight of a healthy child her age. The girl weighted 10st 5lbs.

Newport council issued a statement saying, “a thorough assessment of the child and the family is always considered in cases like these.”  In October 2012 the girl’s weight rose to 10st 10lbs, but had fallen to 7st 7lbs  by August 2013 while she was in care. This extreme case highlights the bigger problem of childhood obesity.

A spokesperson from Public Health Wales, said “fast food advertising, especially for high fat, highly processed foods, as is the amount of fast food outlets in more deprived areas and a lack of play spaces for children,” were at the root of the problem.

Parents have passed the consumer culture onto their children. They are finding it more and more difficult to say no. The current economic climate does not help the situation either, with a Bargain Bucket growing in appeal for cash strapped families.

The cost of living is increasing and wages are not matching it. Times are tough and families need help. This can be done financially by the government, but organisations such as YogaBugs also have a role to play. The role is one of education. Both for the children and the parents.

YogaBugs encourages children to do physical exercise. The beauty of it is the children do not see it as a chore or task to be completed, they are in fact playing. Whilst doing the physical exercise of yoga, the children are participating in stories and going on wild adventures. There are many benefits of children’s yoga, such as improved concentration, but the YogaBugs programme is specially designed to also develop numeracy, literacy and self-esteem. YogaBugs also support the parents with booklets on exercises for home and the YogaBugs Fun Zone has some great stuff to help parents keep their children healthy. 

Keeping children healthy is the responsibility of everyone. The poor girl in Newport was let down by everyone who came into contact with her. Surely somebody could have prevented a situation where a child is taken into care because they are severely overweight.

if you would like to help keep children fit and healthy, could you run a YogaBugs franchise? YogaBugs are looking for the right people to join their network and help more children be physically and emotionally active. Make a positive difference!

Kids eating healthy

picky-little-eater (1)

Fast food is a big part of modern life these days, making it incredibly hard to teach a child how they should eat healthy. The cheapest and easiest foods are those that are normally the least healthy for us.  If you give your child the choice between healthy food and junk food, you are more than likely not like the results.

Even though it isn’t possible to get a child to like all healthy foods, there are some ways to get your child/children to try and hopefully like at least a few of them. Allowing you can be as creative as you like, getting kids to eat healthy foods can be a little harder than people think.

Here are some great ideas to make eating healthy fun for your child/children.

  • Sneak the healthy food in.  Even though it would be great if your child to understood the importance of fruits and vegetables, this isn’t always the case. If you can’t get them to eat good food willingly, there are ways to sneak them in, such as making
    muffins out of bananas or apples, or pizza with spinach on it, or blending vegetables into mash potato.
  • Call fruits and vegetables by funny names.  You can refer to broccoli as “trees”, making them more fun to eat. There are many different names you can call fruits and vegetables, even making up your own if you prefer. Majority of children prefer to eat foods that sound fun.
  • Try to make the foods taste better. Ranch dressing is great for broccoli, while peanut butter is a great topping for celery. There are several combinations for vegetables that can make them taste much better for children. You can let your child pick a topping for a vegetable; even if it’s something you wouldn’t normally like yourself, they will think this is fun and will make them want to taste it as they have chosen what to out onto it.
  • Dress the vegetables and fruit up.  Just as much as calling them names help children eat healthy foods, making them look funny also helps. You can do this by making funny designs on the plate, or setting them up to look like people.

For example you could draw a funny face onto a banana skin and call the banana ‘Barry the banana’. Although some parents don’t like their children playing with their food, sometimes it helps to get them to eat healthier.

There are several ways to make your kids eat healthier, but in order for them to enjoy it also has to be fun as well, this means the parents interacting with them and making it fun.

Getting children to eat healthy isn’t always an easy task, because children usually don’t like foods that are good for them. It can however, be done with a bit of creativity and fun. Hopefully, doing this will help your child develop a love of healthy foods for the rest of their lives.

 

Is My Child Obese?

As I sit down on Sunday evening and watch my daughter dance around the lounge whilst dancing on ice is on the TV, I wonder how the Doctors could’ve said she is border line obese…

I’m Lisa, mum of Kyla, my gorgeous six year old. A few weekends ago I took Kyla for an eye test and what I thought was going to be a routine appointment ended up with her in hospital having a CT scan – she is fine and that’s a story for another time. The reason I share this is because while we were at the hospital the nurses carried out some routine health checks, they measured Kyla’s height and we were told she is below average, not a total shock, as I’m not very tall.

They also weighed her and that is when I was faced with something I wasn’t expecting. “Kyla weighs the same as an average 8 year old” I was told “She is border line obese…” I couldn’t believe what I was hearing… obese, really… my little Kyla? I knew she wasn’t a skinny girl, but she’s active and eats healthily and I would never have thought she was obese. In fact I was more worried about whether she would start to get body conscious at a young age and start talking about dieting – anorexia is becoming more common in young girls and  as someone who has always been a bit body conscious, that was on my mind more than her being obese!

On hearing that Kyla was overweight I started to analyse what we feed her and how much exercise she does do – she goes to gymnastics once a week, swimming once a week, she does PE at school twice a week, cycling at the weekend (weather permitting) and as extras, I put on the YogaBugs DVD or ‘Just Dance’ on the Wii or we get the yoga mat out and do some exercises together.

I am an active person and I make sure she gets her 5 hours of exercise a week.

So how is her diet? On a typical day she has cereal (and not the chocolate or sugary kind!) with fruit in the morning, for lunch she takes in a ham sandwich, a piece of fruit, a yoghurt, and some tomatoes and carrots, in the evening we’ll cook something like fish, potatoes and vegetables or spaghetti bolognaise, she sometimes has a small dessert or just a biscuit with her milk….we don’t go to McDonalds or KFC, we don’t have crisps in the house, we’re don’t eat very much  junk food, but she may have some sweets at the weekends as a treat…  so I have decided to cut that down.

I work full time for YogaBugs, I understand the importance of a healthy diet and exercise, we talk about it all the time, we promote it and yet somehow, whether I think my daughter is overweight or not, I have been faced with the fact she weighs the same as an average 8 year old and I feel like I have let her down.

So what do I think about the statistics? Does ‘average’ take into account genes, body shape, growing up? I look at Kyla and I compare her other children at school, does she look ‘fat’ compared to the other children? I look…and they all look different shapes and sizes and I wonder what ‘average’ is.

Do I think Kyla is border line obese? No, I don’t and I am happy with what she eats how much she exercises, yet I can’t ignore the facts that were presented to me that compared to the ‘average’ 6 year old she is overweight….