Concentration develops over time

My child won’t do as they are told…how many times have you said that being a parent?

At YogaBugs we work with children aged 3-12 years old. However we not only work with the children but also the parents. Our regular contact with parents means that our instructors often feedback and we notice some interesting trends in the children that regularly attend our classes..

One of the most common trends is that “my child struggles to concentrate.” Sometimes parents are so worried by this perceived problem that they are almost reluctant to let their child participate in a class. They are concerned their child is ‘not ready’ “Sean doesn’t always follow instructions’, or ‘Faye will often just do what she wants and that will ruin the class.’

The concern these parents have for how their child may have a negative impact on the class for others is commendable but at YogaBugs we have great news for them. All children struggle to concentrate. We are able to tell parents ‘Your concerns are totally normal and we have done the research to make sure our classes develop this part of the brain and keeps children engaged.’

Toddlers and young children’s brains work differently to those of fully grown adults. Amazingly adults can find this a very difficult concept to grasp. The truth is toddlers and young children are so interested and excited in their surroundings that their innate desire to explore the world around them means that sitting in one place for an extended period of time is of little interest to them. Young children are notoriously self-directed, quite simply they have not yet developed their brains to fully understand social norms. A young child is still developing their emotional intelligence and as such they lose the urge to stay involved once their interest has faded.

We love this about young children. At YogaBugs we work with children to help them retain this fascination with the world and we believe it is our job to be entertaining and inspire the child to engage throughout the whole session. Yes young children may struggle to sit and listen for extended periods of time, but YogaBugs engages their imagination and keeps them busy physically.

Developing the ability to concentrate

Young children are constantly on the move and with boundless energy move quickly from one activity to the next. They have so much energy they are actually hit with an overwhelming urge to move onto something else. Again this is almost incomprehensible to adults.

As a child matures their attention span develops and matures over time.

Passive to active. – When your child was a baby they could only look at and interact with objects directly in their line of sight. As a toddler they then develop the ability to look around and choose objects. As they continue to grow they will begin to make choices. It is then up to the adult to help the child make the right decisions.

Unsystematic to systematic searching. –  A baby will just gaze at objects in a haphazard way and then put the other end in their mouth. As a baby becomes a toddler it will begin to investigate the object systematically and methodically. As they continue to grow, they will begin to make choices on what they search for, becoming more able to discern what is and what is not of interest to them.

Broad to selective. – A baby struggles with filtering out other sources of information. Toddlers however are able to concentrate more selectively. Eventually children are able to multi-task, after all even young children can play a DS and watch television at the same time.

What can parents do to help improve concentration?

  • Minimise distractions
  • Avoid games and television that foster short attention spans
  • Actively encourage children to look for things
  • Create a quiet area
  • Keep the house tidy
  • Develop with the child, as a child progresses so must the parent
  • Encourage use of eye contact
  • Bring your child to your local YogaBugs class

 

YogaBugs and Concentration

The ability to concentrate is a key life skill. All YogaBugs classes are specially designed to improve concentration for young children by combining fun with exercise; children go on wild adventures where they may roar like a lion or blast into outer space. Through our creative visualisation techniques in our classes we help all children believe they are unique and special.

To find your local YogaBugs class or to enquire about joining our team of talented franchises and to give something back to the children in your area please visit: www.yogabugs.com / www.yogafranchises.co.uk 

Top Five Tips To Improve Your Child’s Concentration

  1. Get your child to YogaBugs. Unlike any other children’s activities YogaBugs is specially designed to not only give your child an enjoyable physical work out but also to improve their concentration. They will learn loads, have fun and develop their concentration skills. By using the yoga postures to tell stories, YogaBugs are able to engage children on a variety of levels and develop many skills.
  2. Play ‘Beat The Clock’. Deadlines get things done. If a task has to be completed in a set time this will help your child focus. They way to make it fun is to turn into a game. As a general rule assume your child can concentrate without a break for one minute per year of age. So if your child is 5, set the clock to 5 minutes and ask them to complete the task before the alarm rings.
  3. Avoid overwhelming your child. If your child is whisked from activity to activity they will never settle. Choose a couple of activities and allow for downtime in between. This will help them focus and will produce better results. Remember quality over quantity.
  4. Eat the right foods. Eating healthy food will give your child the energy they need to focus for longer. Avoid foods that are high in sugar as these will lead your child to crash.
  5. Remove all distractions. If you want your child to focus make sure all diversions are out of the way. If the television is off it ceases to become an option. There is no such thing as multi-tasking only multi-failing.

To find your local YogaBugs class or to attend a free taster session please visit: www.yogabugs.com.

We are actively seeking business minded individuals to join our team of talented franchisees who bring the joy of YogaBugs to children in their area. Please visitwww.yogafranchises.co.uk for more info or call Lisa on 0121 77 77792

Improve your child’s listening skills

As a parent it is very easy to get frustrated because you feel your child is not listening. Sometimes the reason for the child’s none compliance is rather straightforward, they are more interested in what they are watching on television or playing on their games console. Of course other factors can also affect your child’s ability to listen, such as how long they have already had to concentrate for and the environment they are in at that particular time. As a parent there are certain strategies that you can adopt to increase your child’s ability to listen in all circumstances.

First of all, find your local YogaBugs class. YogaBugs sessions are especially designed to develop children’s listening skills. YogaBugs teaches children to concentrate for longer periods of time and actively encourages compliance with spoken instructions. Of course for the children they are simply having loads of fun going on a wild adventure using adapted yoga poses.

There are also lots of strategies you utilise at home to help develop your child’s listening skills.

Always give lots of praise for good listening – Children love positive reinforcement. If they learn they can win your approval simply by listening then you will find them more willing to be compliant.

Make eye contact – Even though you are busy, if it is important that your child listens to you then you need to demonstrate this importance. Try and avoid talking to them across the other side of the room while you are focussed on a a different task. Stop what you are doing and ensure you have made eye contact. This will help them to engage better with what you are saying.

Be specific when giving instructions – Give your child the best possible chance of understanding by being clear with your instructions. Make clear the behaviour you want from your child and the time frame you want it in.

There is no silver bullet to developing your child’s listening skills but if you take this 360 degree approach then over time you will without doubt see huge improvements.

To find your local YogaBugs class or to inquire about joining our team of talented franchises please visit: www.yogabugs.com / www.yogafranchises.co.uk 

Concentration develops over time

Inspiring children since 2006

YogaBugs develops children’s concentration

 

 

My child won’t do as they are told

 At YogaBugs we work with children aged 3-12 years old. However we not only work with the children but also the parents. Our regular contact with parents mean that our instructors often feedback and we notice some interesting trends.

One of the most common trends is that “my child struggles to concentrate.” Sometimes parents are so worried by this perceived problem that they are almost reluctant to let their child participate in a class. They are concerned their child is ‘not ready’ “Sean doesn’t always follow instructions’, or ‘Faye will often just do want she wants and that will ruin the class.’

The concern these parents have for how their child may have a negative impact on the class for others is commendable but at YogaBugs we have great news for them. All children struggle to concentrate. We are able to tell parents ‘Your concerns are totally normal and we have done the research to make sure our classes develop this part of the brain.’

Toddlers and young children’s brains work differently to those of fully grown adults. Amazingly adults can find this a very difficult concept to grasp. The truth is toddlers and young children are so interested and excited in their surroundings that their innate desire to explore the world around them means that sitting in one place for an extended period of time is of little interest to them. Young children are notoriously self-directed, quite simply they have not yet developed their brains to fully understand social norms. A young child is still developing their emotional intelligence and as such they lose the urge to stay involved once their interest has faded.

We love this about young children. At YogaBugs we work with children to help them retain this fascination with the world and we believe it is our job to be entertaining and inspire the child to engage throughout the whole session. Yes young children may struggle to sit and listen for extended periods of time, but YogaBugs engages their imagination and keeps them busy physically.

Developing the ability to concentrate

 Young children are constantly on the move and with boundless energy move quickly from one activity to the next. They have so much energy they are actually hit with an overwhelming urge to move onto something else. Again this is almost incomprehensible to adults.

As a child matures their attention span develops and matures over time.

Passive to active. – When your child was a baby they could only look at and interact with objects directly in their line of sight. As a toddler they then develop the ability to look around and choose objects. As they continue to grow they will begin to make choices. It is then up to the adult to help the child make the right decisions.

Unsystematic to systematic searching. –  A baby will just gaze at objects in a haphazard way and then put the other end in their mouth. As a baby becomes a toddler it will begin to investigate the object systematically and methodically. As they continue to grow, they will begin to make choices on what they search for, becoming more able to discern what is and what is not of interest to them.

Broad to selective. – A baby struggles with filtering out other sources of information. Toddlers however are able to concentrate more selectively. Eventually children are able to multi-task, after all even young children can play a DS and watch television at the same time.

What can parents do to help improve concentration?

 

  • Minimise distractions
  • Avoid games and television that foster short attention spans
  • Actively encourage children to look for things
  • Create a quiet area
  • Keep the house tidy
  • Develop with the child, as a child progresses so must the parent
  • Encourage use of eye contact

 

YogaBugs and Concentration

The ability to concentrate is a key life skill. It is also an important skill in becoming a good footballer. YogaBugs classes are specially designed to improve concentration for young children.