Technology Is A Ticking Time Bomb For Children

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Researchers at Swansea University have discovered that the number of children receiving treatment for back or neck pain has doubled in the last six months. Their research has found that more than two thirds of primary school children are experiencing back or neck pain over the course of one year. Things need to happen to make a difference.

The research highlights the growing unease in the medical community about the excessive use of computers, tablets, consoles and smart phones. Children are becoming less active at home and spending more time on computers at school. It has been well documented that excessive use of these technologies can have a negative impact on posture. The excessive use of computers and consoles has also seen children take part in less physical activity  This has also resulted in high child obesity rates. More needs to be done get children to be physically active.  

Lorna Taylor the physiotherapist involved in the research said “Modern lifestyles and the increase in technology are having detrimental effects on our children’s musculoskeletal health and, if not addressed in school and at home now, will have far reaching effects for our children, the future working generation and society. This is a health care time bomb.” What Lorna Taylors’ predicting is a huge strain on the NHS in the the future, as it is overloaded by people with back and neck injuries caused by to much time spent in front of a screen as young children. It is not a cure that is needed but rather a prevention. 

Adam al-Kashi, the head of research and education at charity BackCare responded to this study by saying, “There are many pluses to modern life and technology, but the darker side is how it divorces us from the need to use our bodies and exert ourselves physically. We are now living dangerously convenient lifestyles, where you don’t even have to move to exist.” The solution is creating an activity that inspires children to leave the laptop and do something to counteract the damage. 

One of the key benefits of Yoga is how it can improve body posture., it realigns the spine. This can be done easily with a few yoga poses a week. A good session of yoga could be the difference between a life with or without back and neck pain.

Whilst it may be easy to explain the benefits of yoga to a an adult and an adult with a back injury will try most things to alleviate the pain, it may be more difficult to inspire a young child, and they almost certainly will have no interest or perhaps understanding of the benefits of preventing back pain. Therefore they have be inspired in a different way.

YogaBugs is for children from when they are first are able to walk until the age of twelve. YogaBugs however is so much more than just a yoga. YogaBugs uses yoga postures to take children on wild adventures, the postures are the medium through which a story is told and acted out by the children. The children love it but they do not realise they are doing yoga. They are getting all the benefits and having fun. The way YogaBugs has been designed means that for children there is also hidden benefits for numeracy, literacy, self-esteem and social interaction. YogaBugs is the answer to diffusing the ticking time bomb of back and neck pain.

Whilst across the UK there are already thousands of children benefiting from YogaBugs, many more still need to be offered the chance. YogaBugs are looking for the right people to join their franchise network. With 10 years franchising experience YogaBugs know what they are doing so much so, they are able guarantee their franchisees an income of at least £30,000 per year. 

An international franchisor represented in Australia, China and Singapore, YogaBugs is the leading children’s activity franchise. Franchisees do not need a background in yoga just a passion for making  a  positive difference to the lives of as many children as possible. Could you do it?

 

 

Yoga is now a secular practice

YUP - Down DogVarious traditions of yoga are found in Hinduism, Buddhism and Jainism and it is practised as a spiritual and ascetic discipline. It is of course for many still an integral part of their religion. Yet, yoga has been embraced across the Western world and by people of all races, cultures and most religions. Across the West, yoga with its breath control, simple meditation, and the adoption of specific bodily postures, is widely practised for health and relaxation.

There are many hidden benefits with yoga such as improved concentration, posture and improved strength and flexibility. With YogaBugs unique use of storytelling and adventures told through the medium of yoga there are other benefits to children from when they can walk until the age of 12. These include concentration, core skill development and improved social development.

In the West for the vast majority yoga is totally secular. It is not a medium for teaching religious beliefs. But across the globe yoga instructors have come up against vocal and determined opposition. This was recently highlighted in the United States. The issue of yoga in schools reached a boiling point in California this summer when a family filed a suit against the Encinitas Unified School District after the start of a pilot yoga program in an elementary school. As Reuters notes, a judge refused to block the teaching in July, ruling that ‘yoga at it’s roots is religious.’ but its modern practice is secular and “a distinctly American cultural phenomenon.”

In the USA yoga practitioners simply dismiss such criticisms as a  ’concern of the far right’.  In the UK whilst yoga rarely has to fight such prejudice on religious grounds it is still viewed by some with scepticism. This is despite recommendations from many health organisations including the NHS.

YogaBugs has a crucial role to play going forward. Whilst it uses traditional yoga  postures it inspires children to be physically active and use their imagination. Yoga has simply become a medium of play with many benefits, hidden from the children because they are having great fun. It is learning by stealth. Anyone who ever watches or participates in a YogaBugs class instantly changes their preconceptions and marvels at how the classes work. The children really enjoy them and over time when they attend regularly parents see measurable benefits to their children’s life skills.

The only way for yoga to overcome the negative preconceptions is for companies like YogaBugs to drive the message forward. As a business opportunity YogaBugs has everything you could need to be a success. With 10 years franchising experience YogaBugs are the leading children’s activity franchisor. Whilst YogaBugs have franchisees making a difference across the country we are always looking for the right people to spread the message. If you would like to find out more about the YogaBugs franchise opportunity click here www.yogafranchises.co.uk

Many of our franchise owners are not yoga teachers themselves but were attracted by the nature of the business. YogaBugs has such a distinct offering that there is nothing else quite like it. It inspires children to be both physically and emotionally active. It ticks all the boxes and encourages children to think for themselves, which means ultimately they will one day be able to form their own beliefs. This can only be a good thing.

 

5 A DAY and your family

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Do you cook and shop for a household, including a fussy eater or two?

It’s easier than you might think to ensure everyone gets five portions of fruit and vegetables a day.There are many ways to introduce more fruit and vegetables into your family’s diet. The wider the variety of fruit and vegetables you eat, the better.Dietitian Azmina Govindji gives a few simple tips to get you started.

Think about your day
There are 5 A DAY opportunities throughout your family’s day.

“Not all those opportunities are immediately obvious,” says Govindji. “A cooked breakfast, for example, can give you several portions if you have grilled mushrooms, baked beans, grilled tomatoes and a glass of unsweetened 100% fruit juice.”

If you have cereal or porridge for breakfast, add some fruit, such as sliced bananas, strawberries or sultanas.

Govindji highlights some other 5 A DAY opportunities:

  • Morning break at school. All children aged between four and six at Local Education Authority-maintained schools are entitled to one free piece of fruit or vegetable a day, which is usually given out at break time. If your child is older, you could send them to school with a piece of fruit to eat at break time. The School Food Regulations ensure that fruit and/or vegetables are provided at all school food outlets, including breakfast clubs, tuck shops and vending machines.
  • Lunchtime at school. A school lunch provides your child with a portion of fruit and a portion of vegetables. If you give your child a packed lunch, there are many ways to add fruit and vegetables. Dried fruit counts towards their 5 A DAY, so why not try sultanas or dried apricots? Put salad in their sandwiches or give them carrot or celery sticks, cherry tomatoes, satsumas or seedless grapes. A lot of swapping goes on at lunch, so talk to the mums of your child’s friends to see if you can all give your children at least one portion.
  • On the way home from school. At home time, kids are often very hungry. Take this opportunity to give them a fruit or vegetable snack. This could be a small handful of dried fruit, a banana, a pear, clementines or carrot sticks. When they’re really hungry, they’ll try foods they might otherwise refuse.
  • Dinner time. Get into the habit of having two different vegetables on the dinner table. You don’t have to insist that the children eat them, but if Mum and Dad always do, they may end up trying them. Vegetables in dishes such as stews and casseroles also count. When cooking these dishes, avoid adding extra fat, salt and sugar, and use lean cuts of meat.

Get children involved early
Getting your child involved in choosing and preparing fruit and vegetables can encourage them to eat more.

“Familiarise young children with the colours and shapes of fruits and vegetables as early as possible,” says Govindji.

“Each weekly shop, let them choose a fruit or vegetable they’d like to try. Supervise your child in the kitchen while they help you prepare it.”

Present your children with as wide a variety of fruit and vegetables as possible and make eating them a normal part of family life.

“If your children aren’t keen, canned vegetables, such as sweetcorn, lentils and peas, can be a good place to start,” says Govindji.

Disguising vegetables, by grating carrots into bolognese sauce, for example, can also work, but don’t rely solely on this.

“Try not to reinforce the idea that vegetables are unpleasant and always need to be hidden in foods. Instead, have fun together by trying lots of different fruit and veg and finding what your children like.”

Sourced from: www.nhs.uk